When to use have had or have?

When to use have had or have?

In the present perfect, the auxiliary verb is always have (for I, you, we, they) or has (for he, she, it). In the past perfect, the auxiliary verb is always had. We use have had in the present perfect when the main verb is also “have”: I’m not feeling well.

Is it okay to say have had?

Using “Have Had” in a Sentence Knowing the effective use of “have/has had” is good knowledge to have in order to talk about an event from the past and connect it to the here and now. Also, this is a technique describing an event that has not necessarily been completed.

Is it wrong to say have had?

You use past tense for something that occurred in a known time in the past, which is not the case here. The second one, with “have had,” which is correct, is in the present perfect tense, which describes an event that has occurred in an undefined time in the past and is still relevant now.

Can I say have had?

“Have had” is using the verb have in the present perfect tense. Consider the present tense sentence: I have a lot of homework. This means that I have a lot of homework now.

When we have to use have?

While the verb to have has many different meanings, its primary meaning is “to possess, own, hold for use, or contain.” Have and has indicate possession in the present tense (describing events that are currently happening). Have is used with the pronouns I, you, we, and they, while has is used with he, she, and it.

Has have had example?

Have had and had had

  • I have a sister.
  • She has a car.
  • He has a nice job.
  • I have breakfast at 8.30.
  • I have a shower before I go to bed.
  • I have a nap in the afternoon.

Is had had correct?

“Had Had” Another double you might encounter is “had had,” and Frank from New York would like to know if it’s a correct phrase. It is correct, though it too might seem a bit awkward.

What is the grammar rule for had?

The formula for the past perfect tense is had + [past participle]. It doesn’t matter if the subject is singular or plural; the formula doesn’t change.

Has have had difference?

‘Has’ is the third person singular present tense of ‘have’ while ‘had’ is the third person singular past tense and past participle of ‘have. Both are transitive verbs, but ‘has’ is used in sentences that talk about the present while ‘had’ is used in sentences that talk about the past.

Has had VS had?

You have to use “had had” if something has been done long back, not recently. But if something has been done recently, then you can use “have had” or “has had” depending on the pronoun.

Has have had use?

‘Had’ is the past tense of both ‘has’ and ‘have’.

  • have. Have is used with some pronouns and plural nouns:
  • has. Has is used with the third person singular.
  • contractions. I have = I’ve.
  • negative contractions.
  • ‘have’ and ‘has’ in questions.
  • ‘have got’ and ‘have’
  • ‘have’ and ‘has’ verb tenses.
  • modal verbs: ‘have to’

When to use has, had and have?

Whenever you use “he or she” you are using the third person singular so you would have to use has or had in those cases. She has been working for that company for 2 years. He has been studying English for a year. As for the other examples you could have to use has.

When do you use have as a verb?

As a main verb, have is used to talk about our possessions, relations, experiences etc. I have a sister. She has a car. He has a nice job. I have breakfast at 8.30. I have a shower before I go to bed. I have a nap in the afternoon. When have is used as an ordinary verb, it has past and past participle forms.

Which is the perfect form of have had had?

The present perfect form of have is have had. ‘ Have you had your breakfast?’ ‘I have had a cup of coffee, but I haven’t had anything to eat yet.’ I haven’t had any rest since morning. The past perfect form of have is had had (had + past participle form of have).

When do you use have as an auxiliary verb?

Have is one of those auxiliary verbs that can also be used as an ordinary (main) verb. When have is used as an auxiliary verb, it helps us to form the perfect and perfect continuous tenses.

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